Vindicating Tiananmen Square

Official who broke with the Communist Party over the Tiananmen Square massacre is calling for democracy

Epoch Times
June 3, 2016
By: Larry Ong, Epoch Times 

Bed bugs, Luo Yu thought when he was awakened by a biting sensation late at night on June 3, 1989.

Crowds of Beijing residents watch the military block access to Tiananmen Square in Beijing on June 7, 1989. (AP Photo/Sadayuki Mikami)
Crowds of Beijing residents watch the military block access to Tiananmen Square in Beijing on June 7, 1989. (AP Photo/Sadayuki Mikami)

Luo, a colonel and head of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) General Staff Department’s aviation equipment office, turned on the lights, checked the sheets, and found nothing.

The mysterious insect bites and intermittent “ta! ta! ta!” sounds that seemed to issue from the Jianguomen area near Beijing’s Tiananmen Square kept Luo wide awake the rest of the night.

At breakfast, a domestic servant told Luo Yu and his mother that military vehicles were burning in the streets.

It was gunfire I heard in the night, Luo thought to himself.

It was gunfire I heard in the night, Luo thought to himself. Later that day, before boarding his scheduled flight to Paris for a military exhibition, a state media broadcast confirmed Luo’s suspicion—the PLA had opened fire on the pro-democracy Chinese students and citizens who had occupied Tiananmen Square for about seven weeks.

Luo Yu, son of revolutionary Chinese Communist Party leader Luo Ruiqing, in Harrisburg, Pa., on Dec. 12, 2015. (NTD Television)
Luo Yu, son of revolutionary Chinese Communist Party leader Luo Ruiqing, in Harrisburg, Pa., on Dec. 12, 2015. (NTD Television)

Luo Yu, now 71, had endured the ravages of the Party on his family during the Cultural Revolution (1966–1976).

Following the Cultural Revolution, Luo watched in dismay as China opened up economically at the cost of official malfeasance and the Chinese people’s steep moral decline.

He lost all hope in the Party when the Party’s personal military force spilled blood on June 4.

He lost all hope in the Party when the Party’s personal military force spilled the blood of Chinese citizens in front of a historic imperial compound on June 4.

Given his revolutionary pedigree, Luo was destined for top military office and rank and could easily have parlayed his heritage into immense illicit personal wealth. Instead, he resigned from the military, renounced the Party, and walked away from China and the public eye in 1990 with barely a whisper.

Nearly two decades later, Luo has returned with potent words: In a best-selling memoir, he recalls his interactions and disillusionment with the upper echelons of Party leadership and offers political counsel in open letters addressed to current Communist Party leader Xi Jinping.     [FULL  STORY]

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