US – China Relations

Bloomberg
Date: February 16, 2019
By: Marc Champion

Pence speaks with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg Saturday. Photographer: Thomas Kienzle/AFP via Getty Images

If China and the U.S. are in the midst of a divorce, Europeans look increasingly like the children.

That was the impression given by a series of back-to-back appearances on Saturday, from U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, Chinese politburo member Yang Jiechi, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. The speeches put growing great power rivalries on display, but with Europe more the object of a custody battle than a participant.

Speaking at the annual Munich Security Conference, Yang looked like he was trying to drive a wedge between the U.S. and its European Union allies, singling out transatlantic differences over multilateralism and technology investment.

He spent much of his speech extolling the virtues of cooperation, international organizations and free trade, popular in Europe, and attacked the dangers of “protectionism,” as well as “hegemony and power politics.” The U.S. wasn’t named, but the target was clear.

Yang disputed Pence’s warnings that Chinese technology giant Huawei Technologies Co. would expose European 5G networks to the risk of espionage and suggested that Europeans deserve more respect from their traditional ally.

“I hope some Americans will have a bit more confidence in themselves and be a little more respectful to people, people in the so-called old world,’’ said Yang, a former Chinese ambassador to the U.S., using a common American euphemism for Europe. “People all know where their interests lie, so let there be fewer lecturers.’’    [FULL  STORY]

China’s politics are such that China’s ruler is in no position to negotiate in good faith with the United States.

The Daily Beast
Date: 02.16.19
By: Gordon G. Chang

Photo by: AFP Contributor

There was virtually no progress on “structural” issues in the just-concluded U.S.-China trade talks in Beijing, and unfortunately there won’t be any unless President Donald Trump decides to walk away from the ongoing negotiations.

Xi Jinping, the Chinese ruler, is in no position to negotiate in good faith with the U.S., in large part due to Communist Party politics. Trump, therefore, has to either abandon his ambitious trade goals or push Beijing to the edge of the cliff.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin met Xi on Friday and the talks head for Washington next week.

“I hope you can make persistent efforts to push forward an agreement that can benefit both sides,” Xi said, according to state broadcaster China Central Television. “We all think that in terms of maintaining the prosperity and stability of the world, as well as promoting global economic prosperity and development, our two countries share broad mutual interest.”

China and the U.S. “share broad mutual interest”? Actually, both countries, at far different stages of economic development, do not.

The conduct of China’s senior leaders betrays a belief that they calculate their interests in ways far different than their American counterparts. After all, over the course of decades, the Chinese party-state, either directly or through enterprises and affiliated concerns, has stolen trillions of dollars of U.S. intellectual property.    [FULL  STORY]

China’s ominous and extensive military build-up in the South China Sea has all the hallmarks that it is “preparing for World War III”.

News Corp Australia Network
Date: January 31, 2019
By: Jamie Seidel

A Chinese J-11 fighter jet practices firing rockets at a weapons range. Military aircraft have not yet been stationed on Beijing’s island fortresses. Picture: PLASource:Supplied

Republican Senator James Inhofe of Oklahoma has said what many fear: China’s military build-up in the South China Sea looks as though it is “preparing for World War III”.

His blunt statement came during a Senate hearing yesterday discussing the new challenges being presented by Russia and China.

And Senator Inhofe isn’t happy about how the world has got to where it’s at.

He says the US sat back and watched as China staked its claim on the contested reefs and rocks, and did nothing as it turned them into artificial islands bristling with weapons and fortifications.

And the way it has muscled-in on this disputed territory has resulted in a significant change to the balance of power in South East Asia.    [FULL  STORY]

CNBC.com
Date: Jan 29, 2019
By: Kate Fazzini

  • China and Russia pose the biggest cyberthreat to the United States, but for very different reasons, representatives from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence say.
  • The ODNI report also says Russia has developed the capability to shut down U.S. infrastructure, including power and energy companies, as it did in Ukraine in 2015.
  • Threats from Iran and North Korea area also continuing to grow, including substantial attacks against the banking sector, according to the intelligence officials.

A new government report calls China the top cyber-espionage threat to government agencies and

Joshua Roberts | Reuters
FBI Director Christopher Wray; CIA Director Gina Haspel and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats arrive with other U.S. intelligence community officials to testify before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on “worldwide threats” on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 29, 2019.

U.S. businesses, and warns that the country has “the ability to launch cyber attacks that cause localized, temporary disruptive effects on critical infrastructure — such as disruption of a natural gas pipeline — for days to weeks in the United States.”

A day after two landmark indictments against against China’s Huawei, the Senate heard from leaders from the CIA, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, National Security Agency and FBI on the increasing threats from China, as well as new cyberthreats posed by Russia, Iran and North Korea.

Legislators also discussed actions beyond the criminal cases like those brought against Huawei, including legislation meant to combat cyber espionage and other threats. Huawei and China responded to the Justice Department’s allegations early Tuesday, questioning the allegations and saying they have tried to cooperate with U.S. authorities with little response.

The Senate hearing gave new insight into the scope of the worst global cyberthreats, and some insight into action legislators and intelligence officials might take to prevent it.
[FULL  STORY]

 

Joshua Roberts | Reuters
FBI Director Christopher Wray; CIA Director Gina Haspel and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats arrive with other U.S. intelligence community officials to testify before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on “worldwide threats” on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 29, 2019.
A new government report calls China the top cyber-espionage threat to government agencies and U.S. businesses, and warns that the country has “the ability to launch cyber attacks that cause localized, temporary disruptive effects on critical infrastructure — such as disruption of a natural gas pipeline — for days to weeks in the United States.”

A day after two landmark indictments against against China’s Huawei, the Senate heard from leaders from the CIA, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, National Security Agency and FBI on the increasing threats from China, as well as new cyberthreats posed by Russia, Iran and North Korea.

Legislators also discussed actions beyond the criminal cases like those brought against Huawei, including legislation meant to combat cyber espionage and other threats. Huawei and China responded to the Justice Department’s allegations early Tuesday, questioning the allegations and saying they have tried to cooperate with U.S. authorities with little response.

The Senate hearing gave new insight into the scope of the worst global cyberthreats, and some insight into action legislators and intelligence officials might take to prevent it.

 The New York Times
Date: Jan. 29, 2019
By: Paul Mozur and Raymond Zhong

Wilbur Ross, the United States secretary of commerce, speaking on Monday about charges of bank fraud and stealing trade secrets against Huawei of China.CreditCreditSarah Silbiger/The New York Times

SHANGHAI — Ever since Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer at the Chinese technology giant Huawei, was arrested in Canada nearly two months ago, Chinese officials have denounced the move as “wrongful” and “arbitrary” — a political affair cloaked in a judicial one.

Now that the United States has laid out its case against Ms. Meng in greater detail, neither Huawei nor the Chinese government has easy options for responding or retaliating.

Huawei, the world’s largest provider of the equipment that powers mobile phone and data networks, said on Tuesday that it was innocent of charges unveiled in Washington the day before that it had misled the United States government about its business in Iran, obstructed a criminal investigation and stolen American industrial secrets.

China’s Foreign Ministry called again for the United States and Canada to release Ms. Meng, who is a daughter of Huawei’s founder and chief executive, Ren Zhengfei.    [FULL  STORY]

Bloomberg News
Date January 22, 2019
By Chris Strohm

  • Document issued every four years guides collection, analysis
  • ‘Democratization of space’ cited as an emerging challenge

Russia and China are taking advantage of changes in the “strategic environment” that has prevailed for almost a century to gain influence and undermine American objectives, according to a new strategy issued by U.S. intelligence agencies.

The document released Tuesday says global trends such as the weakening of international institutions, attacks on Western democracy and isolationist tendencies within governments have emerged as major challenges.

“Russian efforts to increase its influence and authority are likely to continue and may conflict

Dan Coats, director of national intelligence, speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, June 7, 2017. Two top U.S. intelligence officials during the hearing refused to say whether they were asked by President Donald Trump to help impede an FBI investigation into RussiaÕs role in the 2016 election. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

with U.S. goals and priorities in multiple regions,” according to the strategy released by Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats. “Chinese military modernization and continued pursuit of economic and territorial predominance in the Pacific region and beyond remain a concern, though opportunities exist to work with Beijing on issues of mutual concern” including North Korea’s nuclear arsenal.

While the concerns about Russia are at odds with President Donald Trump’s efforts to forge better relations with President Vladimir Putin, the worries about China are in sync with the president’s confrontation with President Xi Jinping over trade and intellectual property.

Space, Cyber Weapons
An international race to dominate space and rapid advances in technology, including cyber weapons, also pose new challenges for the U.S., according to the 36-page document, which is issued every four years to drive U.S. intelligence collection and analysis.

“The strategic environment is changing rapidly, and the United States faces an increasingly complex and uncertain world in which threats are becoming ever more diverse and interconnected,” the strategy states.

The reference to a weakened international order is a new element compared with the strategy issued in 2014. It comes amid political turmoil in the U.S. and allies, including moves by Trump to pull back from international obligations.    [FULL  STORY]

U.S. Commerce Department named national security concerns

Taiwan News
Date: 2019/01/11
By: Matthew Strong, Taiwan News, Staff Writer

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – The United States government has refused to issue the local affiliate of China’s Huawei group, Huawei Technologies, with an export license due to national security concerns, reports said Friday.

The refusal occurred last June after the company’s original export license expired in April, according to the Wall Street Journal. The Commerce Department reportedly turned down Huawei’s application for a renewal covering software, high-speed data transmission and telecommunication technology, the Liberty Times reported.

The U.S.-based company, which reportedly employs more than 40 people, protested against the government decision.

However, the report also mentioned that Huawei might not suffer too much, since most of what its U.S. affiliate exported, did not require government licenses, the Liberty Times reported.

The dispute between the U.S. government and Huawei escalated with the arrest of Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou in Canada. While out on bail, she is still staying in the North American country while Washington is trying to have her extradited. Meng is the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei.    [FULL  STORY]

Business Insider
January 9, 2019
By: Alex Lockie

The J-20 has a lot of missions it excels at. Beating a US F-15C in close combat is not one.
 Times Asi/Flickr
  • The makers of China’s new J-20 stealth fighter revealed the combat mission of the aircraft, and one of its key tasks would most likely see it getting shot down by decades-old US and European fighter jets.
  • The J-20 has an impressive stealth design and good missiles that make it ideal for attacking some key targets that could degrade or even cripple the US military.
  • But when it comes to old-fashioned air superiority, which China says the J-20 will take on, the US’s F-15 and Europe’s Typhoon could most likely beat it with ease.
  • The US’s top air-superiority fighter, the F-22, outclasses the J-20 by a wide margin in terms of taking control of the skies.

The makers of China’s new J-20 stealth fighter revealed the combat mission of the aircraft, and one of its key tasks would most likely see it getting shot down by decades-old US and European fighter jets.

The J-20 has impressed observers with its advanced design and formidable weapons, but the jet’s actual combat mission has remained somewhat of a mystery.

Read more: The real purpose behind China’s mysterious J-20 stealth fighter jet

But Andreas Rupprecht, a German researcher focused on China’s air power, recently posted an informational brochure from the Aviation Industry Corporation of China, the J-20’s maker, laying out its mission.

It described the J-20 as a “heavy stealth” fighter that’s “renowned” for its dominance in medium- and long-range air combat and lists first “seizing & maintaining air superiority” as its core missions.

It also lists interception and deep strike as missions for the J-20, falling roughly in line with Western analyses of the jet’s capabilities.

But the J-20s purported air-superiority role is likely to raise more eyebrows.

Read more: China’s most advanced stealth fighter may now be able to strike targets at greater distances than ever.    [FULL  STORY]

The News Lens
Date: 2019/01/05
By: Billy Perrigo

Credit: Bill Abbott / Flickr

The US State Department urged travelers to China to ‘exercise increased caution’ on Jan. 3.

China hit back on Friday against a new U.S. advisory that warns citizens to “exercise increased caution” there when traveling.

Lu Kang, a spokesman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry, said the advice “cannot stand up to scrutiny,” according to the Associated Press.

Credit: DepositphotosA plane flies over Shanghai Pudong International Airport.
The Jan. 3 travel advisory, issued by the State Department, warned of the “arbitrary enforcement of local laws” and “special restrictions” on people with dual U.S. and Chinese citizenship. It came days before talks on the U.S.-China trade war were set to start.

The advisory also warned of the “coercive” practice of exit bans, when authorities prevent people from leaving China. The State Department said these practices have been used to force people to cooperate with Chinese government investigations.    [FULL  STORY]

The New York Times
Date: Dec. 12, 2018
By Keith Bradsher, Alan Rappeport and Glenn Thrush

Image
Despite the offense China has taken at the arrest of a Huawei executive, a move requested by the Trump administration, Beijing’s response has been measured.CreditCreditThomas Peter/Reuters

BEIJING — The recent arrest of a top Chinese tech executive at the Trump administration’s request seemed certain to provoke a geopolitical showdown pitting Beijing against Washington.

The detained executive is a daughter of one of China’s most admired business leaders. She helps run a company, Huawei, at the center of a global race to dominate the next generation of telecommunications technology. And her arrest, widely viewed inside China as a direct affront, comes at a time of already pervasive suspicion among the Chinese public and leadership that the United States wants to block China’s rise through a trade war.

Yet seemingly against the odds, Beijing decided to take a measured response to the Huawei incident. The Chinese leadership has compartmentalized the situation as a law enforcement dispute while making concessions on trade to help defuse tensions.

China’s tempered approach is borne, in part, out of a position of weakness. The country’s economy is in a sharp downturn, putting political pressure on President Xi Jinping to reach a deal with President Trump. American officials recognize the leverage they now have, wielding tariffs to extract concessions that Beijing has long delayed or rejected altogether.
[FULL  STORY]