China and Russia could disrupt US energy infrastructure, intelligence report warns on heels of Huawei indictments

CNBC.com
Date: Jan 29, 2019
By: Kate Fazzini

  • China and Russia pose the biggest cyberthreat to the United States, but for very different reasons, representatives from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence say.
  • The ODNI report also says Russia has developed the capability to shut down U.S. infrastructure, including power and energy companies, as it did in Ukraine in 2015.
  • Threats from Iran and North Korea area also continuing to grow, including substantial attacks against the banking sector, according to the intelligence officials.

A new government report calls China the top cyber-espionage threat to government agencies and

Joshua Roberts | Reuters
FBI Director Christopher Wray; CIA Director Gina Haspel and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats arrive with other U.S. intelligence community officials to testify before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on “worldwide threats” on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 29, 2019.

U.S. businesses, and warns that the country has “the ability to launch cyber attacks that cause localized, temporary disruptive effects on critical infrastructure — such as disruption of a natural gas pipeline — for days to weeks in the United States.”

A day after two landmark indictments against against China’s Huawei, the Senate heard from leaders from the CIA, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, National Security Agency and FBI on the increasing threats from China, as well as new cyberthreats posed by Russia, Iran and North Korea.

Legislators also discussed actions beyond the criminal cases like those brought against Huawei, including legislation meant to combat cyber espionage and other threats. Huawei and China responded to the Justice Department’s allegations early Tuesday, questioning the allegations and saying they have tried to cooperate with U.S. authorities with little response.

The Senate hearing gave new insight into the scope of the worst global cyberthreats, and some insight into action legislators and intelligence officials might take to prevent it.
[FULL  STORY]

 

Joshua Roberts | Reuters
FBI Director Christopher Wray; CIA Director Gina Haspel and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats arrive with other U.S. intelligence community officials to testify before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on “worldwide threats” on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 29, 2019.
A new government report calls China the top cyber-espionage threat to government agencies and U.S. businesses, and warns that the country has “the ability to launch cyber attacks that cause localized, temporary disruptive effects on critical infrastructure — such as disruption of a natural gas pipeline — for days to weeks in the United States.”

A day after two landmark indictments against against China’s Huawei, the Senate heard from leaders from the CIA, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, National Security Agency and FBI on the increasing threats from China, as well as new cyberthreats posed by Russia, Iran and North Korea.

Legislators also discussed actions beyond the criminal cases like those brought against Huawei, including legislation meant to combat cyber espionage and other threats. Huawei and China responded to the Justice Department’s allegations early Tuesday, questioning the allegations and saying they have tried to cooperate with U.S. authorities with little response.

The Senate hearing gave new insight into the scope of the worst global cyberthreats, and some insight into action legislators and intelligence officials might take to prevent it.

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